FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS

Shopping Online


Find Out More

Our offices


Find out More

Get in touch


Find Out More

HDMI A-Z


What is HDMI?

HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is the first and only industry-supported, uncompressed, all-digital audio/video interface. By delivering crystal-clear, all-digital audio and video via a single cable, HDMI dramatically simplifies cabling and helps provide consumers with the highest-quality home theatre experience. HDMI provides an interface between any audio/video source, such as a set-top box, DVD, BluRay player, or A/V receiver and an audio and/or video monitor, such as a digital television (DTV), over a single cable.

HDMI supports standard, enhanced, or high-definition video, plus multi-channel digital audio on a single cable. It transmits all ATSC HDTV standards and supports 8-channel, 192kHz, uncompressed digital audio and all currently-available compressed formats (such as Dolby Digital and DTS), HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless digital audio formats Dolby® True HD and DTS-HD Master Audio™ with bandwidth to spare to accommodate future enhancements and requirements. HDMI 2.0 ensures dramatically improved high speed transmission of HDMI signal as well as it enables you to watch Ultra HD – 2160p at very high refresh rates some of which are beyond your TV’s limitations.

  • Convergence – HDMI is the interface for convergence of PC and consumer electronics devices: HDMI enables PCs to deliver premium media content including high definition movies and multi-channel audio formats. HDMI is the only interface enabling connections to both HDTVs and digital PC monitors implementing the DVI and HDMI standards.
  • Evolving standard – HDMI is continually evolving to meet the needs of the market: Products implementing new versions of the HDMI specification will continue to be fully backward compatible with earlier HDMI products.

What is HDCP and are these cables HDCP compliant?

HDCP stands for High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection. It is a digital rights management technology used by content providers such as movie studios to protect their media property from being illegally distributed. Since HDCP is a requirement of the HDMI format, all HDMI cables are HDCP capable by default. HDCP is a mandatory component of HDMI. There is no such thing as a non-HDCP HDMI cable or device. Yes, these cables will pass an HDCP signal.

Will I get both audio and video by connecting just one HDMI cable?

Yes, HDMI is designed to deliver both high definition digital video and multi-channel digital audio. *Some A/V receivers will only provide switching and pass through functions and will not play the audio information in the HDMI signal. It will simply pass the signal through to the display.

What is AWG?

AWG stands for “American Wire Gauge.” It is the thickness of the wire inside the cable. The lower number AWG denotes thicker wiring and thicker overall cable. Thicker cables are recommended for longer cable runs because they offer less resistance along the signal path.

These cables say "For In-Wall Use." Does that mean they can only be used in wall? What is CL2/CL3?

“For In-Wall Use” refers to the CL3 rating these cables receive from Underwriters Laboratories (UL). It means that these cables have a slow burning outer jacket, 100% Halogen free, should meet most fire codes and are safe for in-wall installations. The CL3 rating does not affect the appearance or performance of the cables. They can be used in or out of wall.

Where can I find further information regarding HDMI specifications?

A great resource is the FAQ’s page on the HDMI.org website:
http://www.hdmi.org/learningcenter/faq.aspx

Do I need HDMI 2.0 cables for 2160p / 4K?

No, HDMI has supported 2160p since HDMI 1.4 which has the potential to support 2160p.

What is Category 2?

Recently, HDMI Licensing, LLC announced that cables would be tested as standard or High-Speed cables. Standard (or “category 1”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 75 MHz, which is the equivalent of a 1080i signal. High-Speed (or “category 2”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased colour depths and/or increased refresh rates. High-Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600). It is possible for a cable to pass a 1080p signal and 1.3 extended bandwidth signal without being Category 2. These cables would have bandwidth that are beyond category 1 but below category 2.

I ordered 2.0 cables but the cables I received have 1.4 stamped on them. Did I get the right cables?

The specs inscribed on the cables are placed there by the cabling manufacturer. The ones that mill with wires and make the runs of bulk wires. The 1.4 inscription is to indicate that the cabling was designed to be used to construct cables that will meet the overall 1.4 specification. The raw cabling is purchased by our cable assembling plants who also buy connectors and other parts and assemble the pieces to make a complete, terminated cable and varying lengths. A complete cable is then submitted for certification so that the entire line of completed cable will be certified at 1.4 at whatever sub version is the current at the time of submission. So, while the “cabling” is made to meet 1.4, it is the complete cable that is certified as 2.0.

Do you manufacture HDMI 2.0 cables that are longer than 10m / 33ft?

Currently, 20 metres / 65.6 feet is our longest HDMI 2.0 cable. Though longer cables can be made to the same construction standards as shorter certified cables, there are no 2.0 certified cables beyond 25ft that we are aware of at this time.

What is the difference between a "Standard" HDMI cable and a "High-Speed" HDMI cable?

Standard (or “category 1”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 75 MHz, which is the equivalent of a 1080i signal. High Speed (or “category 2”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased colour depths and/or increased refresh rates. High-Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600).

Will I still be able to receive audio through HDMI if I use this adapter?

You will no longer be able to receive audio when converting HDMI to DVI or another type of connection that does not support audio.

Will these cables work with my new 120 Hz display?

Yes, absolutely. Most of our cables have been tested up to 2000 Hz.

Do you manufacture HDMI 2.0 cables that are longer than 10m / 33ft?

Currently, 20 metres / 65.6 feet is our longest HDMI 2.0 cable. Though longer cables can be made to the same construction standards as shorter certified cables, there are no 2.0 certified cables beyond 25ft that we are aware of at this time.

Are all of the new HDMI versions backward compatible with previous versions?

Yes, all HDMI versions are fully backward compatible with all previous versions.

I ordered 2.0 cables but the cables I received have 1.4 stamped on them. Did I get the right cables?

The specs inscribed on the cables are placed there by the cabling manufacturer. The ones that mill with wires and make the runs of bulk wires. The 1.4 inscription is to indicate that the cabling was designed to be used to construct cables that will meet the overall 1.4 specification. The raw cabling is purchased by our cable assembling plants who also buy connectors and other parts and assemble the pieces to make a complete, terminated cable and varying lengths. A complete cable is then submitted for certification so that the entire line of completed cable will be certified at 1.4 at whatever sub version is the current at the time of submission. So, while the “cabling” is made to meet 1.4, it is the complete cable that is certified as 2.0.

Do you manufacture HDMI 2.0 cables that are longer than 10m / 33ft?

Currently, 20 meters / 65.6 feet is our longest HDMI 2.0 cable. Though longer cables can be made to the same construction standards as shorter certified cables, there are no 2.0 certified cables beyond 25ft that we are aware of at this time.

Will these cables work with my new 120 Hz display?

Yes, absolutely. Most of our cables have been tested up to 2000 Hz.

Will I still be able to receive audio through HDMI if I use this adapter?

You will no longer be able to receive audio when converting HDMI to DVI or another type of connection that does not support audio.

What are the mini HDMI adapters and cables used for?

The mini HDMI adapters and cables are designed to be used with small portable devices such as camcorders and digital still cameras.

Are all of the new HDMI versions backward compatible with previous versions?

Yes, all HDMI versions are fully backward compatible with all previous versions.

What is the difference between a "Standard" HDMI cable and a "High-Speed" HDMI cable?

Standard (or “category 1”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 75 MHz, which is the equivalent of a 1080i signal. High Speed (or “category 2”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased colour depths and/or increased refresh rates. High-Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600).

What does Extender/Equalizer do?

Extender/Equalizer allow you to transmit high definition audio/video streams across long distance without any digital degradation. It also corrects any digital error in the stream and provides 40dB equalization to compenstate for any cable transmission loss. To ensure a crystal clear HDTV picture it will stop any digital noise (sparkles).

What is the difference between DVI and HDMI?

– HDMI is DVI with the addition of: Audio (up to 8-channels – uncompressed) 
– Smaller Connector 
– Support for YUV Colour Space 
– CEC (Consumer Electronics Control) 
– CEA-861B InfoFrames

I'm having trouble with a connection to a particular device. What steps should I take to try to correct the problem?

Review the following:

  1. Try swapping out the cables.
  2. Make sure that the device works with a direct connection to the display without the switcher in between.
  3. Make sure you have the switch and television turned on before turning on any source devices. If everything is already on, try turning off and on the source device.
  4. Try every port on the switch.
  5. Make sure you have the latest firmware loaded on your devices.
  6. The problem with HDMI switchers is there is no one switch that is compatible with every device out there. In fact, even with the same brands, one model of DVD player may work with a particular switch but a different model will not.
  7. Also, compatibility is not specific to a single device. Instead it’s a 3 way relationship between the source, the switch and the display. So, a particular DVD may work through a particular switch to a certain TV, but not to another TV, but that TV may work through the switch with another DVD player. Given that, you end up with infinite number of possible combinations so it’s impossible to know based on brands what devices with work with a particular switch and what won’t. The trick is to find a switch that will work with your particular combination of devices. In theory, a switch will work with every device but only if it’s connected in turn to another device that it is compatible with. Unfortunately, finding the right switch is a bit of trial and error.
  8. The easiest way to see if an IR remote control is transmitting a signal or not is to check it with a digital camera. Even though IR is invisible to the human eye, it can be detected by the electronic sensors on a digital camera.
  9. If you have a digital camera or camera phone, point the remote at the camera’s lens and check it on the screen of your camera / phone. Press a button on the remote and you should see a pale purple light pulsing in the front of the remote. If you don’t get any light we will assist you further.

I have 2 HD displays, how can I switch between the 2 displays?

  1. You can easily switch between the 2 HD Displays by using the 4×2 HDMI Cross switch. The 4×2 HDMI cross switch has 4 Inputs and 2 Outputs. The 4×2 HDMI Cross switch has the ability to let you watch 2 different programs simultaneously.
  2. For example, you can watch a HD Sports event on your projector and a DVD or Computer can be displayed on a secondary HD display all at the same time! The Cross switch does not split or show the same program on both outputs. The advantage is that you can watch 2 different programs on 2 displays or simply switch between both displays. A huge benefit is for viewers with a projector and a LCD/Plasma who then can use the cross switch to view the projector on “special” events in order to save wear and tear on the bulb life.

Can I split HDMI and watch the program on 2 HDTVs?

HDMI can be split and distributed to multiple HDTVs using an HDMI splitter Distribution Amp. There are some HDMI “Y” cables that can physically connect 1 HDMI source to 2 HDTV, but that will not work. You must use an HDMI splitter Distribution Amp.

A passive “Y” cable will not be able to process the HDCP content protection protocol and will cause the HDTV to shut down. The HDMI splitter Distribution Amps have internal HDCP keys that can independently handle multiple HDCP sessions and allow 1 single HDMI program to be displayed on multiple HDTVs.

How to distribute HDMI over standard Ethernet Cables?

It is possible to distribute HDMI over a pair of standard Ethernet cables by using HDMI to Ethernet     converters. The HDMI Ethernet converter enables transmission of 1080P HD HDMI digital video and audio over a pair of standard Ethernet CAT5e/6 cables. Using HDMI over Ethernet Transceiver allows installers to use standard CAT 5/ 6 cables for ease of installation. Ethernet cables and connectors are easily field terminated thus allowing installers to easily install the proper length cable needed for ultimate flexibility and eliminate logistics problems of having custom length HDMI cables. No need to pre-measure and customer order cables. Allows transmission of 300ft (1080i) and 150ft (1080p) over Ethernet cables.

How do I get surround sound to my Audio Receiver from HDMI?

There are several ways to transmit sound from your HDMI source player to your Surround Sound System. If your Audio Receiver has HDMI audio processing capability, imply connect the HDMI source to your Surround System via the HDMI connection.

If your Audio system only has an optical(Toslink) or stereo input, HDelity audio extractors feature digital audio (uncompressed 5.1 / 7.1) extraction as well as a stereo and SPDIF outputs which will enable you to connect your HDMI sources to a Cablesson HDelity audio extractor and the digital audio will be extracted from the existing HDMI cable in a digital uncompressed or stereo format. This will allow you to transmit it to your surround system /soundbar and enjoy a crystal sound transmission.

Is this plate HDMI 1.4 compatible?

Yes, our wall HDMI plates are 1.4 compatible as well as they are designed to work with HDMI 2.0 devices and are indeed HDMI 2.0 certified.

My HDTV only has DVI. How can I get HDMI/DVI video and stereo sound to it?

Switching multiple digital video and Stereo Audio to a DVI input  on an HDTV may be difficult because only 1 set of L/R stereo Audio Input is mapped to the DVI in which case we have come up with other solutions and great products with which our technical department will be happy to assist you further.

Have any questions we didn't answer?